Sunday, January 15, 2017

Salmon Fishing Scotland Prospects for the Tay, Perthshire, Scotland Opening Day 2017.

Prospects for the Tay, Perthshire, Scotland Opening Day 2017.

There are now only a few hours until the river Tay opens its salmon fishing season for 2017. The excitement is building slowly with anticipated large crowds expected at Meikleour and Kenmore for the public opening day events.
The salmon fishing season on the River Tay will be opened at the Meikleour Fishings Boathouse on Monday 16 January. A ceremony, organised by the beat in conjunction with the Perthshire Chamber of Commerce and supported by the Tay District Salmon Fisheries Board (TDSFB) and the Tay Foundation, will mark the start of the 2017 season.
The riverside reception by the Meikleour Fishings is open to all from 9 am and the formal opening of the river, accompanied by music and pipers, takes place at 9.30 am. All anglers are welcome to fish Upper Islamouth for a £10 donation to Angling for Youth Development.

Expect a major announcement at this event to benefit the river for years to come.

“It is great to make the first cast of the salmon fishing season on the Tay.
“Scotland is recognised across the world as the destination for salmon and freshwater fishing. Game and coarse angling is worth more than £100 million to the Scottish economy, and supports almost 3,000 jobs, which shows the importance of maintaining and enhancing the quality of our rivers and fish stocks.


William Jack, chairman of the TDSFB, commented: “Salmon angling on the Tay is not just a pastime enjoyed by many from all walks of life but is also a significant contributor to the local economy in this area creating many jobs for ghillies and in the hospitality sector.

Dr David Summers, Director of the TDSFB, added: “There is particular interest in the Tay this year as our ‘spring’ catches have been tending to increase in the last 4 years following a period of decline. The number of larger salmon returning to the river also seems to be on a rising trend.”
Anglers enjoying their first casts last season.
At Kenmore a traditional opening of the salmon season on the River Tay will also be held with a parade of fishermen to the river bank with the Vale of Atholl Junior Pipe Band, the 1st cast of the season will be made to mark the opening of the River Tay and a speaker will wish the anglers 'tight lines' for the season.

There will also be several other smaller ceremonies on the various beats up and down the river to mark the opening.
Full details on the large Opening day events.

Currently the river is running around 3 feet on the Ballathie gauge with a colder weather forecast. Colder and more settled weather is now with us at long last giving the river a great chance of producing some good sport and some early "Bars of Silver" on the opening day and beyond.

A superb Tay bar of silver.
On the first day of the season anglers will be competing for the Redford Trophy, for the heaviest salmon caught and safely released from the River Tay on opening day was first fished for in 1986. It was named after the late Ian Redford of Errol, the then co-owner of the Newtyle beat who tragically died the year before.

The angler who lands the biggest salmon on the day will not only be presented with the Trophy but will receive a £250 tackle voucher courtesy of James Crockart & Sons, the famous Blairgowrie tackle and gun shop.

Anglers who land a witnessed opening day springer should contact Crockarts at 01250 872056 by no later than 5 p.m.

The weather is to be cold and settled as the week goes on. The water temperature was high for the time year but has fallen back to just around 38 degrees Fahrenheit or 3 degrees Celcius, which is more typical for this time of year but this could change by the end of this week. The temperature may come back further with the colder forecast during the week ahead but any salmon that are running may be spread throughout the system after milder conditions prior to the opening day giving everyone a good chance for the coming week. Hopefully there might be a chance of a fresh fish anywhere in the river. There will no doubt be quite a few kelts about on many beats and possibly some later run fish, which have yet to spawn. Spring salmon identification help for those not sure about the different types of fish in the river at this time of year.

As to methods, in settled conditions fishing by any method will have to be slow and deep with large lures to catch the elusive Tay Springer. Harling is also a favoured method at this time of year but be warned wrap up well or it will not be a pleasant experience.

Finally you are reminded that the Tay's policy for January – 1st April 2017 is that all spring salmon must be released, i.e. the Tay has a policy of 100% mandatory release of all salmon caught under the new Scottish Government Statutory Conservation Regulation. Spring salmon are a scarce and precious resource. Please preserve both them and the long term future of your sport by following the release of salmon as it is a now legal requirement during this period even if a fish has died. The Board's bailiff team will be enforcing this new legislation.
When releasing salmon please try to keep the fish in the water as much as possible to give them every chance to recover prior to release. Releasing fish from boats in the river is not recommended. Further information on the policy and good release practice.


Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Salmon Fishing Scotland Complete Tay Salmon Fishing Review 2016.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Complete Tay Salmon Fishing Review 2016.

Tay Salmon Fishing Review 2016.

The river Tay in Perthshire, Scotland has had a disappointing but interesting salmon fishing year by modern standards as the FishTay web site have reported only 4775 Salmon and Grilse being caught for the 2016 fishing season. There was effectively no autumn run. It must be said that salmon fishing catches are no longer easily achieved with this situation being mirrored right across the north Atlantic sea board due to problems at sea with a continued increase in Smolt mortality that is out of the rivers control. In terms of the salmon and grilse catch, the 2016 season total shows an 13% decrease on 2015 and a 24 % decrease on the 5-year average for FishTay beats. It should also be noted that there were no catches in the last 2 weeks of October this and last year due to the extension fishing being stopped in 2014 halfing the October catch effectively and making the 5-year average worse.


Catches reported per month through the season were as follows Jan 18, Feb 158, Mar 323, Apr 531, May 647, Jun 507, Jul 564, Aug 695, Sep 746 and October 586. The spring period from January to May continues to be a positive part of the season, and interestingly it outscored the autumn for the first time in decades. The catch was like 2015 and represents a 7 % increase on the 5-year average. This confirms the trend starting on the Tay 4 years ago with much better spring fishing. The early spring was steady with a better February and the late spring remained positive for the middle river confirming the spring proportion of the catch on the Tay is increasing year on year with this year’s catch being 35 % of the total. We are continuing to see the start of a change in the cycles as in the past and it would have been unthinkable in recent years that there would be more spring salmon caught than autumn fish.
Tay Salmon Catches % by Season 1952-2016.

Further evidence of this phenomenon was a strong June ending the 2016 spring run. The summer period including June to the end of August decreased by 16 % on a stronger 2015 which was disappointing. The run seemed only to last until mid-August. The autumn period was not good and fell back on 2015 with no real run to speak of, September to October showed a 26.8 % decrease on 2015 in reasonable conditions. The Grilse run was poor again pointing to an improving Spring. Another aspect of the catch was the continuation of larger multi sea winter salmon being caught throughout the Tay system in the 20 to 30 pounds’ class, which the river has been famous for over the years.

To provide some context it should be said the 2016 salmon rod catch was disappointing compared to 2015 apart from another strong spring however no run to speak of in the autumn from Mid-August sent alarm bells ringing with the spring outscoring the autumn. Hopefully there will be improvements to come in 2016 but the question should be asked why and has the autumn run disappeared for the foreseeable future due to cyclical change? The spring was again the big plus which is all ready creating massive interests in spring fishing for 2017 with much anticipation after this year’s autumn failing. The summer was reasonable with the end of the spring run and a steady July to mid-August but the autumn was more difficult throughout the river with a distinct absence of a run possibly due to the north Atlantic problems in the sea and this year we could not complain about a lack of water which is more worrying. Thankfully we have a hatchery at Almondbank to help, this maybe something to further develop for the future with all the weather extremes being thrown at us in recent years.

Tay Salmon Catches Season by Season 1952-2016.

The river has had a reasonable year with some positives but everyone expects a lot more so every effort must be made to take the river forward to the levels of the past and put the mighty Tay in its rightful position of being the premiere salmon fishing destination in the world. The river has had another good spring run and catch this season, which may just be down to the majority of anglers returning salmon over the past seasons. Thank you to all anglers who have this season returned their salmon and spring salmon to maintain our sport for the future, it is vitally important and is a great contribution by individuals who care for their sport and the river. Well done! It should be pointed out there are several beats that do not report catches on the FishTay website and the full rod catch for the River Tay in 2016 will be a bit higher than shown on the FishTay website.

2016 REPORT month by month by TDSFB director David Summers.

The 2016 Tay salmon season opened on Friday 15 January. Although there had been relentless rain throughout the winter and major flooding in early January, by great fortune the few days immediately before opening day saw a return to drier wintry weather.
This allowed the river to drop back and clear for a sunny opening day morning. Four springers were caught on the day. The largest landed was a 24 pounder at Findynate.
However, the Redford Trophy for the largest Tay fish of opening day was eventually awarded to Gail O’Dea for a 14 pounder from Taymount’s Linn Pool. After a circulating photograph revealed the 24 pounder appeared to have been hooked on the outside of the jaw. While a few more springers were caught on the second day of the season, catches seemed to dry up over the following week despite continued good water, which was a cause of some slight concern. However, with about a week of January to go, the rain returned once again and the river remained high and unsettled until about ten days into February. Very little could be caught therefore. Only 18 fish were reported on the Fishtay website in January compared to a five year average of 38. The hotspot during this period was the Linn Pool on Stobhall/Taymount.

While February started badly, the fishing picked up in the second week, when colder drier weather set in. From then on, the river was generally fishable. For some of the time the nights were frosty and snow fell inland. Given the loss of the first week or so, the fact that 159 fish were reported on Fishtay for the month against a five year average of 109 was a welcome relief from the initial concerns in January. The largest catches were made in the area from Stanley up to the Linn Pool.

Fishing conditions were generally reasonable throughout March. For most of time, the river ran between about three and five feet with only a few quick lifts, one at the start, one in the middle and one near end of month. Temperatures were generally fairly average, although some days were cool. 322 salmon were reported on Fishtay compared to a five year average of 343, but that average reflects some good Marches in the last few years. The best of the catches were spread from Stanley up to the Islamouth area, with Islamouth gaining the highest score. Middle Tay beats also started to pick up and some fish were caught on Loch Tay too.

April commenced with a rise in level, but the remainder of the month was mainly dry and the Tay fell from about five feet to less than one foot by the end. It also turned cool, with some snow even down to low levels at the end of the month. The total catch is again likely to have been very good, with 531 salmon reported on Fishtay against an average of 428. The catches were now better spread, with the middle river, the Tummel and Loch Tay all getting their share. However, the conditions favoured low water beats like Murthly 2 and Islamouth. The latter did very well with water on the low side for attracting fish into the Isla.

May saw a rise at the start of the month but the river then fell away until the 22nd when there was another rise. Thereafter it turned dry again. May proved to be another good month with 647 salmon reported on the Fishtay website against an average of 597. The focus for catches was mainly in the middle Tay area, the Tummel and the Isla, although the top beat was Islamouth with 98. That was the beat’s best May for at least five years.

Like May, June was mainly a low water month. In the first half, the Tay was generally well under a foot on the Ballathie gauge. On the 16th, the Tay rose to about two feet and the second half saw levels slightly higher but still only at around one foot on average. These water levels helped some beats and hindered others, as might be expected. Islamouth was, once again, the main beneficiary recording an excellent 109. Overall, it was another good month with the main concentration of catches occurring from Stobhall/Taymount upstream, including the middle Tay area. The Isla also continued to see sport but, by then, the Tummel and Loch Tay had cooled off. Although the 506 fish reported on Fishtay was slightly less than the five year average of 526, it should be noted that, in the period 2011 – 15, four of the Junes were among the best since official records started in 1952.

July was a wetter month than June, though by no means a “wet” month. At the start, levels were slightly higher than they had been in June but, with several small to moderate rises over the month, the base level rose by about a foot by the month’s end. 565 fish were reported on Fishtay compared to a recent average of 530, although it should be remembered that recently Julys have been poorer compared to what they were a decade and more ago.

While August commenced with quite low water, there were several modest rises early on and the base level rose to around three feet, peaking on the 12th. Thereafter, it was generally dry, often warm, and the level had fallen well back by the end of the month, although some small daily fluctuations did not always help the fishing. August saw a marked change in the catches however. Only 693 fish were reported on Fishtay compared to a recent average of 954. This was the start of a trend that set in for the autumn and seemed in part to have been due to a poorer grilse run.

September started off with quite low water but a good spate on 10th saw the river rise up to 6 feet, the first of four similar rises through the month. It was hoped initially that, with water, good runs of fresh fish would appear. However, that didn’t really happen. Almost all beats, but not all, struggled compared to what they would expect. 742 fish were reported on the Fishtay website against a five year average of 1341. September was the most disappointing month of the year.

The final fortnight or so of the Tay salmon season was set up with a spate of nearly 6 feet on 29 September. Thereafter, levels fell away gradually, and the river stood at just over a foot on 13 October. On the 14th, rain returned and, on the last day, the river ran five feet up, but fortunately not coloured enough to wipe out fishing. While the Tay closed on the 15th, further rain saw the Earn peak on the 18th, but thereafter there was no appreciable rain there and the Earn closed on 31 October with quite low water. While the Eden saw a small rise on the 24th, it was a similar situation there too. Overall, October proved another disappointing month but not as bad in proportion as September. 578 fish were reported on the Fishtay website against a five year average of 1361. However, that 1361 includes several years of a trial season extension. 679 were reported in 2015 when there was no extension.

What bald figures cannot convey is that, in the autumn, the great majority of the fish caught were to some extent coloured and more of them appear to have been MSW than might be typical. After August, there was an unusual lack of fresh run fish. Indeed, such were the catches of coloured fish in some beats late on, that summer catches perhaps did not do justice to the numbers of fish that must have entered the river at that time. The lack of fresh autumn fish was obviously a great disappointment after good spring catches and good spring fish counts, but it transpires the Tay was not alone. This appears to have been a widespread problem.

Catch and release – spring salmon
In 2015 and 2016, the Board continued to recommend a policy of 100% catch-and-release of salmon up to the end of May. At the time of writing, the latest figures available are only for the 2015 season. These show an increase in compliance from 90% to nearly 97% from 2014 to 2015. This increase must reflect the introduction in 2015 of national mandatory catch and release to 31 March.

Although very few spring salmon were killed in the Tay district in 2015, more were still killed compared to any other district in Scotland, but once again, this will partly reflect the fact that the Tay produced the highest catch of spring salmon in Scotland in 2015.

Catch and release – summer
In addition to continuing the spring salmon policy, in 2015 and 2016, the Board continued the policy that, after May, all female fish should be released and no more than one male fish should be kept per day, which should be clean and, where possible, weigh less than 10 pounds (i.e. clean male grilse). While 2016 data are not yet available, 2015 data show that the catch and release rate, post- spring, generally continues to edge upwards shown in graph below. It should be noted that the apparent reduction in October 2015, reflects the fact the previous four years included trial season extension fish. However, once the 2016 figures are available, it may be that the percentage released in the autumn will be even higher owing to the relative lack of fresh run fish in autumn 2016.


Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Salmon Fishing Scotland Tay Salmon fishing review 2016.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Tay Salmon fishing review 2016.


Tay Salmon Fishing Review 2016.

The river Tay in Perthshire, Scotland has had a disappointing but interesting salmon fishing year by modern standards as the FishTay web site have reported only 4775 Salmon and Grilse being caught for the 2016 fishing season. There was effectively no autumn run. It must be said that salmon fishing catches are no longer easily achieved with this situation being mirrored right across the north Atlantic sea board due to problems at sea with a continued increase in Smolt mortality that is out of the rivers control. In terms of the salmon and grilse catch, the 2016 season total shows an 13% decrease on 2015 and a 24 % decrease on the 5-year average for FishTay beats. It should also be noted that there were no catches in the last 2 weeks of October this and last year due to the extension fishing being stopped in 2014 halfing the October catch effectively and making the 5-year average worse.
Catches reported per month through the season were as follows Jan 18, Feb 158, Mar 323, Apr 531, May 647, Jun 507, Jul 564, Aug 695, Sep 746 and October 586. The spring period from January to May continues to be a positive part of the season, and interestingly it outscored the autumn for the first time in decades. The catch was like 2015 and represents a 7 % increase on the 5-year average. This confirms the trend starting on the Tay 4 years ago with much better spring fishing. The early spring was steady with a better February and the late spring remained positive for the middle river confirming the spring proportion of the catch on the Tay is increasing year on year with this year’s catch being 35 % of the total. We are continuing to see the start of a change in the cycles as in the past and it would have been unthinkable in recent years that there would be more spring salmon caught than autumn fish. Further evidence of this phenomenon was a strong June ending the 2016 spring run. The summer period including June to the end of August decreased by 16 % on a stronger 2015 which was disappointing. The run seemed only to last until mid-August. The autumn period was not good and fell back on 2015 with no real run to speak of, September to October showed a 26.8 % decrease on 2015 in reasonable conditions. The Grilse run was poor again pointing to an improving Spring. Another aspect of the catch was the continuation of larger multi sea winter salmon being caught throughout the Tay system in the 20 to 30 pounds’ class, which the river has been famous for over the years.
To provide some context it should be said the 2016 salmon rod catch was disappointing compared to 2015 apart from another strong spring however no run to speak of in the autumn from Mid-August sent alarm bells ringing with the spring outscoring the autumn. Hopefully there will be improvements to come in 2016 but the question should be asked why and has the autumn run disappeared for the foreseeable future due to cyclical change? The spring was again the big plus which is all ready creating massive interests in spring fishing for 2017 with much anticipation after this year’s autumn failing. The summer was reasonable with the end of the spring run and a steady July to mid-August but the autumn was more difficult throughout the river with a distinct absence of a run possibly due to the north Atlantic problems in the sea and this year we could not complain about a lack of water which is more worrying. Thankfully we have a hatchery at Almondbank to help, this maybe something to further develop for the future with all the weather extremes being thrown at us in recent years.
The river has had a reasonable year with some positives but everyone expects a lot more so every effort must be made to take the river forward to the levels of the past and put the mighty Tay in its rightful position of being the premiere salmon fishing destination in the world. The river has had another good spring run and catch this season, which may just be down to the majority of anglers returning salmon over the past seasons. Thank you to all anglers who have this season returned their salmon and spring salmon to maintain our sport for the future, it is vitally important and is a great contribution by individuals who care for their sport and the river. Well done! It should be pointed out there are several beats that do not report catches on the FishTay website and the full rod catch for the River Tay in 2016 will be a bit higher than shown on the FishTay website.

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Monday, November 28, 2016

Salmon Fishing Scotland Spring at Stanley, Perthshire 2017.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Spring at Stanley, Perthshire 2017.

At Stanley, Perthshire on the Tay we are now looking forward to the spring of 2017.
The last 4 seasons have shown an upturn in spring fishing with consistently better catch returns especially on the Stanley beats of Catholes, Pitlochrie and Benchil where early spring is their best time in colder conditions. Traditionally they have been the best early beats on the river in historical records dating way back and we now appear to be going back to a spring dominance on the river which has been shown on the catch returns this past season. There were more spring salmon caught on the river as a whole than autumn this past season!
A superb spring salmon from Pitlochrie pool at Stanley.
A fresh springer caught on the Slap on the Catholes. This fish was caught casting a fly from the bank.
The latest availability is now on Fishpal under the following links. Catholes, Pitlochrie and Benchil.

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Salmon Fishing Scotland Tay, Perthshire Report for W/E 15th October 2016.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Tay, Perthshire Report for W/E 15th October 2016.

The salmon fishing season on the Tay in Perthshire has now ended for 2016 with the weather not being ideal at times but we are now in Autumn and there has been a very weak run in the past few weeks however catches have improved mainly due to colder conditions. The river has had settled water from a reasonable spate last week after some heavy rain giving excellent autumnal conditions for fishing plus cooling temperatures are seeing catches maintained despite the lack of fresh fish. Expectation was high for the last few days plus settled weather in early October gave everyone a chance of landing a Tay Salmon.

A few autumn salmon have been running and landed throughout last week with excellent conditions for autumn fishing and catches have continued to spread with more water and dropping temperatures making the resident salmon more aggressive. It was another steady week with excellent conditions with around 280 fish landed and the biggest one recorded was in the mid-twenties from several beats. Spring transferred into summer and steady runs came into the river plus better weather was making fishing easier with lower water however plenty fresh water in recent weeks encouraged more fish to run the river with summer disappearing as Autumn came in however no run developed. Traditionally large fish are caught at this time of year which was in evidence again last week.
On the nature front the Sand Martins, Swifts and Swallows have been all over the skies but departing south one by one, Ospreys have gone off south for the winter, Ducks have broods of mature young, Sand Pipers are on the river banks and Dippers and Kingfishers dart past. We are now seeing the arrival of large skeins of Geese as the temperatures start to drop. The splendid autumn colours are here again for another year with turning leaves due to the colder nights, it is truly magical to be salmon fishing in Perthshire on the banks of the silvery Tay. A salmon can be a bonus!!

Friday night saw the Tay Ghillies Association hold a race night in the Tayside Hotel in Stanley to raise funds for the river. There was a good enthusiastic attendance of fishers and locals generating £2676 which will go towards a project involving the Hatchery at Almondbank. Thank you to all who attended and the generous donors giving prizes to make the night a tremendous success.

Beat catches reported (week ending 15th October)
SALMON & GRILSE: Almondmouth 25, Waulkmill 17, Lower Redgorton 8, Luncarty 2, Upper Redgorton 3, Fishponds 8, Benchil 3, Catholes 1, Upper Scone 14, Burnmouth 4, Stobhall 11, Taymount 29, Ballathie 17, Cargill 28, Islamouth 13, Meikleour and Upper Islamouth 18, Kercock 14, Delvine Burnbane 3, Murthly 1 2, Murthly 2 11, Newtyle 3, Dunkeld House 3, Dalmarnock 1, Dalguise 7, Lower Kinnaird 16, Upper Kinnaird 4, Findynate 1, Farleyer Upper 5, Lochlane and Laggan 3, Keithick Mains 5, Ericht Fishing 1.
Total: 280 Largest: Meikleour and Upper Islamouth & Murthly 2 & Upper Kinnaird 25lbs
SEA TROUT: Waulkmill 1, Fishponds 3.
Total: 4 Largest: Fishponds 5lbs

The majority of the salmon were caught in the lower river in early spring, which is understandable with the cold conditions but that has changed with warmer water allowing fish to run further giving improving results up the river including fish from Loch Tay, Loch Faskally and beyond now as fish spread in the system. The lower river has been the barometer for the runs as they enter the river with water temperatures falling to around the low 50’s F. Fish were starting to be caught in greater numbers due to cooling water temperatures plus recent spates should have encouraged more salmon to run and shake the residents up as well.

This past week saw a more fish from the lower river scattered throughout the beats encouraging everyone however the summer run disappeared and an autumn run did not develop. The beats at Stanley and below were seeing steady sport with small runs entering the river and now earlier run fish have dropped back towards their final destinations of Almond, Shochie and Ordie which can only help sport in this area. The beats just above the tide continue to produce fish on a regular basis with Almondmouth, Waulkmill and Lower Redgorton catching 51 between them in a better week. Luncarty had a couple in the week with Canadian Craig Cook landing a 6 pounds fish on a Toby.
Fishponds had 8 for the week with some heavy fish caught up to 18 pounds and including the odd fresh run beauty. Upper Redgorton had a corporate week of guests and managed a couple. Upper Scone had a reasonable week with experienced rods doing well which included 7 from Benchil on Monday. Jack Fryer caught a superb 18 pounds fish on the fly in Horsey on the Pitlochrie beat, Chicken Bob Shaw had a great week with several fish with colleague Gary Blanco Perks.
Tim Greenfield and
Charles Savage enjoyed success on the fly from Benchil landing fish at the same time up to 18 pounds.
Later in the week Marc Herman caught a 13 pounds fish from the same beat in the Plain Water on the fly as well. This week at Stanley we have been remembering the late Neill John Williams who sadly passed away from a long illness late last year. Neill fished on the Tay over several years. Burnmouth had 3 on Monday above Catholes Weir and Robert Galbraith landed a superb 16 pounds fish from the tail of the Black Stones on the Catholes on the fly. Taymount had a good last week with around 30 fish meanwhile Stobhall had a much quieter week with Ray Baileys party. Ballathie and Cargill had good last weeks with 45 between them. Cargill good success with fish landed up to 22 pounds in the week.
The fly proved successful for many anglers with Neil French doing well again and Ian Jardine landing the beats 300th fish of the season. Towards the end of the week the Muir party had fun which included Diana Boreland landing her first ever salmon and hooking several others. Islamouth finished their season with several fish taking their tally for the year close to 500 making it the most successful beat on the river and most were caught on the fly with only odd fish caught spinning in high water. Upper Islamouth and Meikleour had a good week with 18 culminating in a great last day with 9 including a fish at 25 pounds.
The last day saw Scott Sykes landing 3 to 11 pounds, Matthew Allin caught a 24 pounds fish and Andrew McCaig caught his first ever fish weighing 19 pounds. His brother Oliver them landed a 25 pounds fish and Gordon Bissett and John Baillie also had fish.

The middle river has slowed down over recent weeks and were praying for rain and a late run to liven things up. Kercock had a good last week with 14 fish which included
Sam Datta and
Tomas Lundquist.
Delvine and Burnbane finished with a few fish which included Sandy Pringle and Jamie Cumming catching fish up to 12 pounds.
Fish were caught on the Murthly beats and up on Newtyle Steven Cope caught his first ever fish on the fly.
On Dunkled House Brian Joseph managed a 16 pounds fish on the last but one day. Dalmarnock had a quiet end with a single fish however further upstream Dalguise had a good end with 7. The Kinnaird beats fared better with 20 fish including a beast at 25 pounds on the last day.

The upper river was seeing sport with odd fish caught and recent fresh water has improved activities with fish recorded on Findynate and Farleyer beats.

The Tummel is continuing to see limited sport from the Port-na-Craig beat administered by Pitlochry Angling Club and there is now over 6350 fish through the Dam resulting in fish being recorded in Loch Faskally and fish are running the Garry. This is a high figure in recent years caused by the temperature coming up quickly earlier in May and encouraging the fish to run.

The Isla are seeing salmon run up the river and progressing to the Ericht and 6 fish were reported last week from the Keithick Mains and the Lower Ericht. Further up the Ericht above Blairgowrie Michael Preedy ventured down for a last cast of the season on Saturday and managed to catch 5 grilse sized fish, all on the fly within the space of 4 hours, one of which was straight out the sea, the others being slightly to very coloured. Not a bad last few hours on the 2016 season!

Fish have been reported running the Lyon however there was no news from that part of the river last week.

Fish have also been running the Earn with Lochlane and Laggan reporting 3. Other fish are being caught now throughout the river but they are not registered on Fishpal.

The Spring and Summer Salmon fishing seasons are over as now the Autumn with the last few days of the season in October with great expectation. Last week’s catches were more encouraging however trough be told there has been no autumn run to speak of. There is now clear evidence of a cyclical change towards the Spring. Hopefully as we now look forward to spring 2017 there is an increasing run. See you on Monday 16th January 2017.

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Salmon Fishing Scotland Late Autumn Salmon Fishing on Tay, Perthshire 2016.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Late Autumn Salmon Fishing on Tay, Perthshire 2016.

It is now the last few days of the Tay, Perthshire 2016 salmon fishing season with changing weather and dropping temperatures making salmon far more aggressive.
There has not been an outstanding autumn run so far on any Scottish river however dropping river temperatures make the resident fish more likely to take.
This was an 18 pounds fish caught by Tim Greenfield on Benchil caught on the fly from the Long Shot.
Charles Savage with a reasonably fresh 16 pounds fish caught on the fly from the Long Shot on Benchil.
This week at Stanley we have been remembering the late Neill John Williams who sadly passed away from a long illness late last year. Neill fished on the Tay over several years.
There is now a commemorative bench on the Catholes in fond memory of Neill.
Cheers Neill, we all hope you are resting in peace and fishing a good river in heaven.

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

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